Tag Archive for Ts’ehlanyane National Park

Ts’ehlanyane National Park

This National Park is as underrated as it is underused. This is the largest park in Lesotho and no other place is about as far away from it all as Ts’ehlanyane. Lying further north in the district of Leribe, it is reachable by tar roads. This Lesotho Northern Park protects a beautiful high-altitude, 5600-hectare patch of rugged wilderness, including one of Lesotho’s only stands of indigenous forest with a number of rare undergrowth plants that are unique to this woodland habitat. Here indigenous “Ouhout” (Leaucosidea) trees of significant size are preserved.

Maliba Mountain Lodge - Tsehlanyane National Park

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Late snow fall at Maliba Lodge

Maliba Lodge Ts'ehlanyane National Park, Lesotho

Late snow fall at Maliba Lodge

I’ve always heard about the wonders of a Lesotho winter with the landscape blanketed in Snow. Snow is Africa is something that’s almost unheard of, so it was a surprise when we woke up to this special view.

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Massive veld fire ravages Ts’ehlanyane National Park

A Disaster was narrowly averted in Ts’ehlanyane National Park on Saturday (26 September 2010), as a major veld fire swept through the Park, narrowly missing the Maliba Mountain Lodge. Details are unclear as to the exact origins of the fire, but it is believed to have been started by a group of local villagers wanting to use the Soccer pitch that is situated within the Park.Veld Fire at Maliba Lodge in Ts'ehlanyane National Park

The Park has had typical weather for August-September, with late winds and little rain fall. The very dry prevailing conditions of the park’s vegetation, together with strong winds proved the perfect mix for disaster, fanning the fire on its destructive path. Read more

Village Life – from the point of view of an American Peace Corps Volunteer

Juliana Fulton - American Peace CorpsI’m a 23 year-old university grad student from suburban America, who has come to live in a rural village in Lesotho, southern Africa for the next two years.  I’m often asked why I became a Peace Corps volunteer, giving up the comforts of home, flush toilets and electricity, and good salaried jobs, to come live in developing Africa.  I still find it hard to explain, I’m here to help people who haven’t had the advantages that I’ve had.  I’m here for the adventure, to experience the real world outside of my sheltered American college town.  I’m also here because I want to work in international development and believe that living in a community in a developing country was the best way to really understand them.  Most Peace Corps volunteers go to their sites with lofty goals, hoping to make a big difference, to build a community centre or help stop the spread of a disease.  My aspirations are much simpler, to make small improvements in the lives of the people around me.  I’ve been in Lesotho for three months, and they’ve already changed mine. Read more

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