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Author: Juliana Fulton

Juliana is an courageous American Peace Corps volunteer stationed in Lesotho. She very capably, heads up Maliba Lodge's community outreach projects and teaches "life skills" at the local schools.
What 24% HIV+ Really Means

What 24% HIV+ Really Means

When I first signed up for my Peace Corps assignment, all that I was told was that I’d be in Lesotho, working with communities on HIV/AIDS. I was very excited about living in Lesotho, but less so about working on the AIDS pandemic. It just seemed like such a monumental and depressing task. We were told that the official prevalence rate was 24% of people in Lesotho were infected with HIV. It sounds like a lot, but it is totally…

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A Year of Seasons in Lesotho

A Year of Seasons in Lesotho

I have now been in Lesotho, the Mountain Kingdom, for an entire year. It feels brief and incredibly long at the same time. And it’s only half over! I now have seen all of Lesotho’s seasons – one of the few countries in Africa that has four distinct seasons.

Living on a dollar a day

Living on a dollar a day

For the past month I have been living on a dollar a day, which is below the international poverty line.  A friend and I decided we wanted to see what it was like to live like most of the world who live in poverty, or as close to it as we can get.  I calculated the cost of all the food, candles, propane, everything, even soap.  The first week was by far the hardest—I craved sweet things, and was hungry…

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My Impoverished Village isn’t so Poor

My Impoverished Village isn’t so Poor

I have recently begun to see my village in a new light. Going on vacation, spending time with people who’ve never lived in a developing country (basically me nine months ago), made me realize how much Lesotho has changed me. I think Peace Corps changes everyone. Scott one of my friends back home, told me before I left that I could come back a different person, and the idea terrified me.

Being a patient in a Hospital in Rural Africa

Being a patient in a Hospital in Rural Africa

I’ve been surprisingly lucky that I’ve gone six months in rural Africa without so much as a cold.  But a couple of weeks ago I caught a stomach virus that was going around the peace corps volunteers.  I started throwing up and couldn’t stop.  It was after dark, so there wasn’t any more transportation to the nearest town or hospital.  I called the lodge and they came and picked me up and drove me to the hospital, but not before…

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Settling in: Salads and a radio

Settling in: Salads and a radio

I’ve now been in Lesotho for almost six months, and in my village for three and a half. It’s taken a while, but I finally feel at home. My work has developed, so that I have two tasks to do everyday. Being busy and productive has made a big difference on how content I feel.

Sounds of Village Life

Sounds of Village Life

My village has a kind of rhythm and sound that has begun to sound and feel like home.  It is made up of cowbells, distant women singing, children shouting and crying, dogs barking, sheep bleating, metal pots clanking and sometimes an unusual birdsong. It might be because my village is on a steep hillside facing a mountain, but all the noises echo off the mountains and blur into a type of music.  It’s always changing and make the village feel…

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