Felicia petiolata

Felicia petiolata - Daisy

Felicia petiolata - Daisy

Introduction:

The UN has declared 2010 as an international year of Biodiversity. It is also the year that we celebrate the achievements in plant conservation. As such Maliba Mountain Lodge also strives to promote conservation of indigenous flora through displays and education.

Description:

Compositae / atereaceae – Daisy family

(Petiolata – stalked, it refers to the long leaf stalks). The Genus “Felicia” was named after Herr Felix in 1846, a German official at Regesburg. It is one of largest family of flowering plants, and are mostly made up of herbs. There are several species in Lesotho and South Africa. It’s a perennial herbaceous plant that blooms all year round; it is naturally reaching its flowering pick in summer. Its growth habit is spreading.

Gardens wild and wonderful:

An indigenous garden is simply not  complete without a daisy plant (Felicia petiolata) Khotolia – ea – thaba (SS). It will light one corner in your garden in August.  This plant does well in our cool grassland vegetation of Lesotho although care must be taken if planted in the garden as it is prefers semi-shaded spots under the shrubs or below the rock cliffs which normally makes the first striking focal point during the dry  spell in August or at the end of winter.

Cultivation and Care:

Generally it is a disease resistant plant and the ideal time to plant it is spring. It easily propagated with cuttings or you can also dig out established clumps in your garden or pull sprigs or tiny divisions from them and simply replant. It prefers semi shaded areas in the garden, below the trees or as a border plants in front of buildings or other taller plants. Plant in well drained soil mixed with plenty of well rotted compost and preferably fluffy leaf mold.  Water regularly but it can survive periods of drought. Too much irrigation will result in vigorous growth and less flowers.

Plants use:

It can generally be used as a garden plant or a cut flower. It is of no much cultural significance although it is traditionally believed to be used for encouraging good harvest in the field crops.

Distribution:

This species is wild spread although its growth habit is spreading within Lesotho.

Introduction:


The UN has declared 2010 as an international year of Biodiversity. It is also the year that we celebrate the achievements in plant conservation. As such Madiba Mountain Lodge also strives to promote conservation of indigenous flora through displays and education.                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Description:

Compositae / atereaceae – Daisy family

(Petiolata – stalked, it refers to the long leaf stalks). The Genus “Felicia” was named after Herr Felix in 1846, a German official at Regesburg. It is one of largest family of flowering plants, and are mostly made up of herbs. There are several species in Lesotho and South Africa. It’s a perennial herbaceous plant that blooms all year round; it is naturally reaching its flowering pick in summer. Its growth habit is spreading.

Gardens wild and wonderful:

An indigenous garden is simply not complete without a daisy plant (Eelicia petiolatus) Khotolia – ea – thaba (SS). It will light one corner in your garden in August.  This plant does well in our cool grassland vegetation of Lesotho although care must be taken if planted in the garden as it is prefers semi-shaded spots under the shrubs or below the rock cliffs which normally makes the first striking focal point during the dry  spell in August or at the end of winter.

Cultivation and Care:

Generally it is a disease resistant plant and the ideal time to plant it is spring. It easily propagated with cuttings or you can also dig out established clumps in your garden or pull sprigs or tiny divisions from them and simply replant. It prefers semi shaded areas in the garden, below the trees or as a border plants in front of buildings or other taller plants. Plant in well drained soil mixed with plenty of well rotted compost and preferably fluffy leaf mold.  Water regularly but it can survive periods of drought. Too much irrigation will result in vigorous growth and less flowers.

Plants use:

It can generally be used as a garden plant or a cut flower. It is of no much cultural significance although it is traditionally believed to be used for encouraging good harvest in the field crops.

Distribution:

This species is wild spread although its growth habit is spreading within Lesotho.

Prepared by: Bongani Ntloko

+2666 – 63071081 Email: ntlokb@gmail.com

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